Three routes out of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

In this post I offer you three evidence-based approaches to address the effect of traumas large and small, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Our lives, as we support a child with an eating disorder, is peppered with distressing or fearful events — some affect us for a day, and some can bring us to tears, or invade our sleep, even when all is well again. It’s not uncommon for parents to report PTSD.
Our children too accumulate traumas: there’s the eating, the delusional states, the treatment centres, the suicidality, the sense of being utterly alone and misunderstood, and the terrible fights with parents and siblings.

Some traumas stick and lead to post-traumatic stress. Others make us grow and lead to post-traumatic growth.
How can we transform the things that deeply shocked our word into wisdom, gratitude, expansion? Or, less ambitiously, how can we stop being reacting disproportionately to the slightest trigger?

Guided meditations to help you be at your best

Meditations-resilience-BMX-motorbike

A common source of discouragement from parents is this: “I know I should be kind, and calm, and confident, and compassionate, but so many times I just can’t.”

Well, that’s us just being human. This extreme parenting thing can’t be done 100% all the time, and it certainly can’t be done on our own through sheer willpower. We need fuelling for ourselves. We need compassion and understanding and hand-holding.

My book gives you the why and the how of compassion. My new audio resources help you actually experience the power that lies with a compassionate state, so you can shift yourself into a state closer to wellbeing.